Tuesday, January 26

Candyman: Day of the Dead (1999)

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I actually really enjoyed this sequel when it was first released but watching it a few years later I wasn’t so keen.

The Candyman’s great great grand-daughter finds herself being targeted by the hook handed killer in this third film in the series, thanks to a friend who tries to prove that the Candyman was real.

The biggest disappointment here is that Philip Glass did not return to score the film and so with a few exceptions the score is actually quite bad.

Tony Todd is on fine form and Nick Corri is also very good but some of the other cast members are awful.

We are treated to some good deaths, a few jump scares and some nice little touches to keep fans happy.

The story here is actually one of the film’s strong points and it is probably this factor alone that prevented the film from being truly awful.

In the end the film is a nice change of pace but it definitely lacks the atmosphere present in the previous films.

OVERALL SUMMARY
The film is a good effort and is definitely better than part 2 in my eyes but I doubt that any of the sequels will ever be as chilling as the original, although plans for part 4 sound promising. Candyman: Day of the Dead is good for fans of the series but I doubt that many horror fans in general will enjoy it.

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Candyman: Day of the Dead (1999)

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I didn’t have very high hopes for this second sequel in the franchise, considering the fact that it was branded ‘Made for TV’, which never has a very good ring for a movie that is following on from two big-budget cinematic hits. Also, it was supposedly yet another ‘non-sequel’ sequel that seemed to fast-forward a couple of years and wipe the slate clean of the last movie’s events. So when I sat down to watch Candyman , I was surprised to see how good it actually was.

Most people – myself included – would associate the phrases ‘poorly scripted’, ‘badly directed’, ‘bland cinemaphotography’ and ‘day-time-TV actors’ with television movies. But in order to do Candyman any justice, you must push these phrases right out of your mind, and watch the movie as if it was actually a straight-to-video blockbuster, which has a far nicer sound.

It really seemed that [writer, director] Turi Meyer had a vision to bring this movie to the screen with style. The sets are plush and beautifully photographed, and all manner of unusual camera angles are used to give the movie an offbeat, but unique atmosphere. The scares and deaths are surprisingly infrequent, but are gory in the bloodiest sense when they happen. There is also a sense of impending doom – as with the first – that works well, and there are some horrible moments (particularly when Caroline is strapped into a sort of torture chair).

Donna D’Errico (yes, yes, I do know she was once a day-time TV actress!) makes a dissarmingly beautiful heroine, and her acting is more than sufficient in this. She makes an engaging lead – something that all three Candyman movies have going for them – and she manages to keep a straight face through some of the patchier dialogue. Sadly the ending when she faces off against the Candyman – although rather inventive and in-keeping with the whole ‘painting’ idea – seems rather shallow and empty, considering we know that all we need is another dumb fool to mutter ‘candyman’ five times to bring our hook-handed killer back once more.

‘Candyman, Candyman, Candyman, Candyman…’

#OVERALL SUMMARY
Introducing a fresh new style to the series, and giving it a bit of a shake up, this is quite a departure from the first two movies in the franchise. Tony Todd returning as the Candyman is, as ever, a joy to watch, and Donna D’Errico is perfectly capable as the wistful heroine… but the more we learn about the Candyman the less interesting he becomes. Still a good entry, but let’s make this the last.

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